First Drape

For my first drape I decided to explore using pleats as a feature of the garment, to reflect the lines associated with the scallop shell as a fabric manipulation. Using pleats may prove to be difficult as it would be tricky to add embroidery over the pleats, without taking away from the embroidery design or the pleating. I then explored only using pleats in some areas of the drape to create an asymmetrical look. This will enable the embroidery to be placed on the non-pleated area so as to not detract from the design, however I will explore layering the embroidery over the pleating and see how this comes up.

Beginnings of the drape, no armholes. Inverted box pleats.

Beginnings of the drape, no armholes. Inverted box pleats.

Drape using inverted box pleats

Drape using inverted box pleats

Edge of a scallop shell, inverted box pleats create this shape...

Edge of a scallop shell, inverted box pleats create this shape…

I decided to use inverted box pleat as the base of the pleats create almost exactly the same shape as the edge of a scallop shell, highlighting the shell inspiration. I chose to place the embroidery opposite the pleats in just a quick pin up to gage what it may look like, to not hide the pleats and ensure the actual embroidery is not hindered by the pleats.

Drape using knife pleats

Drape using knife pleats

I then re-draped using knife pleats as I felt the inverted box pleats did not capture the design I envisioned nor did they show the lines as I wanted. Having pinned my second traditional embroidery onto the mannequin I am pleased with how the embroidery works with the pleats, the swirl/ circular motion of this embroidery directly contrasts the lines of the pleats, giving another dimension to my shell inspiration. I will put this drape, once sewn, into photoshop and play with scale and my other embroideries to see how it will evolve into a garment.

 

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